Employment and Injury

As much as we might look forward to the weekends and dread Monday mornings, our jobs are an important part of our lives. Many of us value the company of our co-workers, and take satisfaction from work that lets us contribute to society and help others. After all, the average Canadian spends most of their waking hours at their place of employment, so it should be no surprise that we take pride in the work we do.

But what happens when, because of an injury caused by someone else, you are no longer able to do the work you have done your entire life, or you are unable to work at the same level as you were pre-injury?

This is a situation many of our clients find themselves in following injury in a motor vehicle collision. The soft-tissue injuries many people suffer in car accidents means they are unable to carry out the surprising amount of bending, twisting, and postures required for even physically ‘light’ jobs, like office and administration work. Further, even injuries that don’t prevent someone from working can cause pain that makes it difficult to concentrate on the job, resulting in a less efficient, less energetic workday.

Courts in this Province, and across Canada, understand that your ability to earn a living and achieve success in your career depends on your ability to do your job, and do it well. This is why those responsible for an injury are required to compensate an injured party for ‘loss of income’ (usually because of work missed due to injuries) and for ‘loss of competitive advantage’. The latter is awarded when an employee can no longer perform their job at their pre-injury level, and therefore is less likely to receive raises, promotions and other rewards for a job well done.

So if you’ve been injured in an accident and have missed work, or your performance at work has declined due to your injury, don’t let your career suffer. Make it our fight, so you can concentrate on the job you were meant to do.